Decision-Making

Wisdom Is Priceless. How to Get It: The Choice

March 1, 2021

This is an excerpt from my book, 21 Days to Sound Decision Making: How to Grow Your Credibility and Influence through Making Better Decisions


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Getting wisdom is the wisest thing you can do! And whatever else you do, develop good judgment — Proverbs 4:7 NLT

Imagine: in utter despair, you’re sitting beside a judge in a courtroom. 

The prosecuting attorney approaches you and asks, “Miss, will you please recount the events that have led us here?”

Through tears, you tell the tragic story: “A few weeks after I gave birth, I went to sleep holding my newborn one night. All was well. The next morning, I awoke and immediately felt that something was terribly wrong. My son wasn’t breathing.”

The courtroom falls silent.

“I tried to revive him. I tried CPR.” Through a convulsive sob, you barely say, “Nothing worked.”

A juror begins to cry.

You continue: “As I wiped away my tears, I noticed something extraordinary: my son’s hair, mouth, eyes—none of them seemed familiar. Then I realize, this isn’t my child.”

Gasps erupt.

“I didn’t know what to do, so I fled next door to see my friend. We were pregnant around the same time, both still recuperating from childbirth. Although it was early, I crashed through her front door. I saw her gently rocking her son—and I heard oddly familiar crying.”

No one is moving in the courtroom.

“My friend covers her son’s head with a blanket.”

The prosecuting attorney interjects: “Ma’am, is this friend you speak of in this room?”

Trembling, you point to a sobbing woman in a far corner of the courtroom, an infant boy in her arms. “She’s the one. She’s the one I screamed at, ‘That’s my baby! What have you done? You’ve stolen my child and given me your dead son! Give my son back to me!’ I tried to wrestle my child out of her arms, but she pushed me down and called the police. I was taken to jail. I told my story just as I’m telling you now. But she—” You glare at your friend. “She told a different story.”

A pregnant pause fills the courtroom.

Suddenly, the judge announces that he’s come to a decision. “This is a conundrum. Bring me a knife and give that baby to me. I will cut the baby in half so you can both have a part.” 

You shriek, “No! Let the baby live. Give her the whole child. I beg of you, please don’t kill him.” 

The other woman coldly says, “Cut away. If I can’t have him, you can’t either.” 

Immediately, the judge renders his verdict. The child is yours. He determines that you are the real mother because you wanted no harm to come to the child. 

The judge wisely deduces reality. His unreasonable decision to split the baby has uncovered the truth.

How do you become wise?

As you may have guessed, this adapted story is from 1 Kings 3:16–28. The judge was Solomon, the wisest king who ever lived. 

Before rendering this well-known verdict, Solomon had been asked by God what he needed to effectively rule his kingdom. Solomon didn’t ask for power, fortune, or fame. He asked for wisdom: a God-listening heart, the ability to lead well, and discernment between good and evil. 

Because Solomon asked for wisdom, God was pleased and granted him riches and honor as well. And Solomon’s God-given wisdom enabled him to render justice in the case of the stolen baby.

Wisdom is the combination of experience, knowledge, and careful judgment. Wisdom goes beyond knowledge; it’s the knack of knowing what to do. It’s the art of being successful: developing the correct plan to achieve desired results. It’s about making decisions that lead to optimal outcomes. It’s learning the practical skills required to live and lead well.

How do you become wise? It starts with having a deep respect for God and obeying his commands. He is the source of all wisdom. 

Then, ask for it and the Holy Spirit will cheerfully and liberally provide it. 

Lastly, pursue godly wisdom. Give everything you’ve got to acquire and cultivate it. Search the Scriptures. Pray. 

If you develop wisdom, God will show you how to live effectively in a secular world. You’ll avoid the pitfalls or obstacles that others encounter. He’ll work in you and through you to inspire moral behavior and foster well-being. Wisdom will open the path to life, security, and prosperity. You’ll be equipped for leadership and make sound decisions. 

You might even crack conundrums like Solomon. 

Priceless is wisdom. Get it.

Consider

  • Have you asked God for wisdom? 
  • What will you do to acquire and cultivate it? 
  • When will you start?

Pray

Lord, please grant me wisdom: a God-listening heart, the ability to lead well, and discernment between good and evil. May I honor you in all the decisions I make. In Jesus’ name, amen.

Read

  • Proverbs 1:7
  • Proverbs 8:22
  • Matthew 13:44

Want to learn more about 21 Days to Sound Decision Making: How to Grow Your Credibility and Influence through Making Better Decisions? Visit: https://prestonpoore.com/21-days/

Cheers!

Preston

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Advice: Why Many Eyes See More Than One

February 2, 2021

Hi – The below excerpt from my daily devotional, 21 Days to Sound Decision Making: How to Grow Your Credibility and Influence Through Making Better Decisions. The book explores how to make decisions from a Biblical perspective.

If you’re a believer, I hope the content encourages you. If you’re not a believer, no worries. You can still benefit. If you choose to read the article, please do so with an open mind. If not, feel free to move on. Either way, my hope, and prayer are that something resonates with you and that you find the principles valuable. Thanks, take care, and good reading!.

Pres


Don’t have time to read? Got it. You can also listen here.

Refuse good advice and watch your plans fail; take good counsel, and watch them succeed.

—Proverbs 15:22 MSG

I was once under the gun to hire an associate to work with our business partners. I needed to recruit, interview, and fill the open position within two weeks or I wouldn’t be able to hire anyone for that position. And an empty role meant that the work and relationship management would fall on my plate.

Steve seemed like a great candidate. However, a couple of key leaders warned me: “Don’t hire him. He’s not a good fit. If you do, it will be a mistake.” And yet, a trusted peer highly recommended Steve: “He has the right experience and transferable skills. With a little coaching, he’ll be great.”

I moved swiftly and selfishly to hire Steve.

Fast-forward one year. 

While Steve was hired into a harsh work environment and we believed he could break through, he never gained traction with his assigned business partners or market. The business partners demanded more than Steve could deliver. When Steve stumbled, I had to compensate. 

Even though I had ten other team members and was accountable for eighteen markets, I spent 80 percent of my time with Steve and his specific territory. I didn’t want Steve to fail. I saw his success as my responsibility since I’d decided against others’ counsel. I wanted to prove that I could help Steve reach his potential. 

Over time, his key stakeholders rejected him because of a perceived lack of credibility. Steve was no longer invited to meetings or trade rides and lost his ability to influence or add value. I shared the business partners’ feedback with Steve along the way. Trying to support him, I continually spent time helping him solve problems and discuss his concerns. I always encouraged him. And I was genuine with him. We built a plan to improve his performance and connection with the business partner. But Steve didn’t follow through. He’d lost heart.

I realized that I couldn’t develop Steve as I’d thought. His skillset and motivational fit weren’t right for the role. I also realized I’d made a mistake. I’d listened to advice that validated my predetermined choice and immediately discounted differing opinions.

Why? Because I saw potential, or so I told myself. I’d heard what I’d wanted to hear and ignored the ultimately correct guidance provided by others. Acting out of arrogance, I believed that I could single-handedly develop Steve’s analytical, relationship-building, and leadership skills—and that proved not to be the case.

A change needed to happen for Steve’s benefit, for my team, for our business partners, for the company—and for me. Ultimately, Steve was placed on a performance improvement plan and eventually exited from the organization.

Looking back, here’s what I learned about advice:

Seek many opinions

This Latin phrase is right: vident oculi quam oculus—many eyes see more than one. When you face a difficult decision, consult multiple advisors. Seek the opinions of those with diverse backgrounds, experiences, and thinking styles. 

These counselors should have integrity and trustworthiness. They should listen well, think deeply, possess an optimistic outlook, be strategic, and be grounded in reality. When you receive advice, ask: Is this advice honest, actionable, and timely? 

John C. Maxwell says, “If you combine the thoughts you have and the thoughts that others have, you will come up with thoughts you’ve never had!”[i]

Be an unselective listener

Even though I sought wise counsel from others, I selectively listened to what they said. I sought validation, not guidance. I pieced together what I wanted to hear and rationalized my decision. 

Admittedly, I had my own agenda, I was stubborn, and I acted out of arrogance. The Bible says, “Fools are headstrong and do what they like; wise people take advice” (Proverbs 12:15 MSG). If I’d listened early on, Steve and I wouldn’t have suffered through tough circumstances. When seeking counsel, objectively listen to others and don’t filter your thoughts with predetermined bias.

Pray always

I didn’t pray about my decision to hire Steve and moved without consulting God. It became a mess. But I did pray amid the mess and God was faithful. 

For believers, we need to lift everything in prayer, and it should become a lifestyle for us. The Bible says, “Pray without ceasing” (1 Thes. 5:17 ESV). Take every moment and opportunity to pray. Pursue God’s divine understanding, discernment, and wisdom. Make it a continual conversation with God and a way of life. If you do, God will guide you, your decisions, and your circumstances.

Consider 

  • Do you have trusted, integrous advisers who will provide diverse points of view? 
  • When you pursue their counsel, are you looking for guidance or validation? 
  • Are you willing to listen and suspend judgment? 
  • Will you pray about the advice you receive and the decision you will make?

Pray

Lord, please help me to surround myself with wise, godly advisors. Open my heart to listen to their counsel and seek you every step of the way. In Jesus’ name, amen.

Read

  • Proverbs 11:14
  • Proverbs 24:6
  • 1 Kings 1:12

Are you interested to learn more about the 21 Days to Sound Decision Making devotional? Check it out: https://prestonpoore.com/21-days/ and order your eBook today!


[i] John C. Maxwell, Thinking for a Change: 11 Ways Highly Successful People Approach Life and Work (Center Street, 2005).

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8 Simple Steps to Defining Your Values and Guiding Principles

January 9, 2021

Excerpt from “21 Days to Sound Decision Making – How to Grow Your Credibility and Influence Through Making Better Decisions” by Preston Poore


Don’t have time to read? I get it – You can listen to the article as well. Enjoy!

Here is a simple, rule-of-thumb guide for behavior: Ask yourself what you want people to do for you, then grab the initiative and do it for them. Add up God’s Law and Prophets, and this is what you get

(Matthew 7:12 – The Message)

Sound decisions are anchored in core values, the deeply held beliefs or ideals that guide your thoughts and actions. When you make decisions congruent with your values, you feel satisfied; if incongruent with your values, you experience inner stress and conflict. If you know your values, you can make decisions on many fronts like how to live your life, where to work, whom to marry, and whether or not to compromise on an issue or make a change.

Do you know your values and how they affect your decisions? Think about it. 

Do you know what you stand for? What you’d be willing to fight or even die for? 

Let’s take a few minutes to define or confirm your personal values.

#1 Peaks: Identify peak or high point experiences in your life where you were happiest, most satisfied, or fulfilled. What were the circumstances? Who was with you? What values were you exercising at the time?

#2 Valleys: Identify valleys or low points in your life where you experienced inner stress or conflict. What were the circumstances? Who was with you? What values were you not exercising at the time?

#3 Selection: Understanding the peaks and low points, select your top ten values from the list below, adapted and excerpted with permission from MindTools:

Ambition
Artistic Expression
Assertiveness
Authenticity
Balance
Belonging
Celebrate
Challenge
Civility
Clarity
Collaboration
Commitment
Community
Compassion
Competency
Competition
Conformity
Contribution
Control
Courage
Creativity
Dependability
Development
Discipline
Dignity
Diversity
Efficiency
Empathy
Enthusiasm
Fitness
Flexibility
Freedom
Friendship
Fun
Generosity
Growth
Happiness
Health
Humility
Humor
Independence
Ingenuity
Influence
Integrity
Intelligence
Joy
Justice
Leadership
Learning
Leisure
Location
Love
Loyalty
Nature
Obedience
Order
Organization
Positivity
Power
Preparedness
Prestige
Professionalism
Quality
Recognition
Reliability
Responsibility
Restraint
Results-oriented
Security
Self-Respect
Service
Simplicity
Stability
Strategic
Status
Strength
Success
Teamwork
Tolerance
Trustworthiness
Tradition
Understanding
Unity
Variety
Vision

#4 Prioritize: When choosing among options, you’ll be able to know what values are most important to you.

#5 Narrow: Whittle down your list. What are your top three or five values? Imagine someone in an elevator asked you what your values are. Could you rattle them off in thirty seconds? Knowing, understanding, and being able to articulate your values is invaluable as a leader.

#6 Develop: Give your values a richer context. Describe what the value looks like in action. This will help you turn the values into guiding principles.

#7 Examine: Are you living your core values and making decisions that are congruent with them? Rate each selected value from 1 to 10, where 10 is the value fully demonstrated in your decision-making process. Where are your lowest scores? What score would you like to achieve in the future? What action steps will you take to close the gap and elevate the score?

#8 Share: Disclose your values with a trusted confidant and ask if they see your prioritized values demonstrated in your life and decision-making. Why, or why aren’t, they demonstrated? How will you adjust based on their feedback?

My top five values are love, integrity, trust, leadership, and excellence. When I’ve assumed new leadership positions, one of the first things I do is share my values and guiding principles, i.e., how my values look in action. I want to let people know where I stand, what I believe in, and what to expect from me. If my actions deviate from the list, I encourage the team to call me out. 

My guiding principles are:

  1. Integrity – Walk the talk with transparency
  2. Trust – Confident expectation
  3. Leadership – Positively inspire and influence
  4. Excellence – Pursue distinction
  5. Humor – The shortest distance between two people 
  6. Vision – Anticipate the future and go there
  7. Results – Measure progress toward goals
  8. Discipline – Bring order to chaos
  9. Development – Nurture and grow skills, abilities
  10. Collaborate – Develop cooperative solutions
  11. Celebrate – Publicly acknowledge successes
  12. Passion – Possess a burning desire to win

In sharing my values and guiding principles, people understand where I’m coming from, my decision-making motives, and actions. I modeled my approach after Jesus’. In the Sermon on the Mount (Matt. 6:1 to 7:27), Jesus shared his core values and guiding principles with the listeners. He established what he stood for. To make his values and guiding principles easy to understand, he summarized them with this eternal truth: “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets” (Matt. 7:12). If you value Jesus’s words, your values and guiding principles will reflect them. And you’ll make sound decisions that honor God and benefit you and others.

Consider 

  • Do you know your core values and guiding principles? 
  • What role do they play in your decision-making process? 
  • If you told someone your values, would they agree? 
  • Do they honor God?

Before you go . . .

If you’re interested to learn more about how to make better decisions from a Biblical point of view, check out my daily devotional, “21 Days to Sound Decision Making – How to Grow Your Credibility and Influence Through Making Better Decisions” on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Days-Sound-Decision-Making-Influence-Credibility-ebook/dp/B08FXBZ3JP/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=21+days+preston+poore&qid=1600186944&sr=8-1

Cheers!

Pres

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How to Move On From a Bad Decision

October 9, 2020
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They say that the more mistakes you make, the more successful you become. That might be true, but you must deal with your bad decisions effectively before you can move forward. There’s a process to making the most of your wrong choices.

If you can benefit from your right decisions and your wrong decisions, life is easy! Unfortunately, our natural instincts make it challenging to benefit from wrong choices. We become upset, distract ourselves, withdraw, feel embarrassed, or give up altogether.

When you can benefit from wrong decisions, there are no wrong decisions!

Consider these strategies:

  1. Learn the lesson. Every wrong decision has a lesson to teach. It can be painful to examine your wrong choices. Do you know what’s even more painful? Making the same mistake again. Take a little time to figure out what you can learn from your unwise decision.
  2. Move on. There’s nothing to be gained by dwelling on your mistakes. A wrong decision that you’ve never made before isn’t a bad thing. It’s just life.
  3. Take responsibility. You were part of the problem. There’s no getting around it. Taking responsibility allows you to retain control of the situation. You made the mess, so you can fix it.
  4. Talk it out. If you can’t let go of your mistake, spend some time talking with a loyal friend. An outsider often has a more reasonable perspective. Pick up the phone and give someone a call.
  5. Stay present. It’s easy to let your mind run wild after making a wrong choice. There’s nothing to see there. It’s hard to stay in the present moment when things are going wrong all around you. Allowing your mind to wander is just a form of distraction. Pay attention to what is happening right now.
  6. Take preventative measures in the future. How can you prevent a similar occurrence in the future? Did you put yourself into a situation where no good option existed? Or did you merely make the wrong call?
  7. Remember what you still have. You may have lost your business or partner, but that doesn’t have to be the end of the world. Take a moment to remind yourself of the wonderful things you still have.
  8. Forgive yourself. Everyone makes more than a few mistakes. Accept the consequences of your choice and move forward. It’s impossible to always make perfect decisions.
  9. Remember that your next right decision will feel that much better. A vacation only feels good because you contrast it with work. Spend six months in a Florida condo and see how excited you still are. Your bad decisions make your right decisions that much more enjoyable.
  10. You are not your decisions. You are separate from the choices you make. Bad choices don’t make you bad any more than good decisions make you good. Your decisions don’t define you.

Bad decisions aren’t all that bad after all. In fact, you can benefit from all your previous bad choices right now. Make a list of every wrong decision you’ve ever made. Now, go through the process of learning from each of them. What are the lessons you can learn? Imagine if you had done this same process after each mistake was made. Your life would be very different.

Everyone makes bad decisions. The key is to make the most of them. Spend a few minutes each week reviewing your bad choices and learn from them. Most importantly, avoid repeating them. Move on from your bad decisions and benefit from them.

*** Stop wasting time in the aftermath of bad choices when you can make decisions that deliver extraordinary results. Get the “Nine Point Sound-Decision Making Check List” sent straight to your inbox and start seeing exceptional results today. Visit: https://prestonpoore.com

Thanks and take care,

Preston Poore

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6 Mental Errors That Lead to Wrong Decisions

September 25, 2020
Listen to Audio Version

We can often trace the most significant challenges in our life to just a couple of wrong decisions. Effective decisions require clear thinking and accurate perceptions of the situation and how the world works. It’s easy to allow mental errors to lead to making the wrong choice.

It’s not always easy to make a wise decision, but there are things we can do to increase our odds.

Consider these mental errors that can degrade your ability to make a wise decision:

  1. Failing to consider the long-term implications. Short-term thinking can lead to long-term challenges. Many of us focus more on the short-term than the long-term when making decisions. We choose the yummiest food to eat or the most enjoyable way to spend the next hour.
    • In most cases, we are better served by considering the long-term implications of our decisions.
  2. Survivorship bias. We often look at the most successful people as a template for success. We assume their way is the best. However, this fails to consider all the people that follow the same strategy but fail. 
    • For example, many successful people failed to graduate from high school, but it would be wrong to assume that education isn’t helpful to success.
    • Many people have put in the same time and effort as LeBron James or Michael Jordan but failed to become professional basketball players. Perhaps there are other reasons for their success that you haven’t considered. A different approach might work better for you.
    • Some of the most successful people in our society have been successful despite their process.  It’s not always easy to identify when this occurs. 
  3. Overemphasizing loss versus gain. Humans are naturally more sensitive to losing something they already have than motivated to gain the same item. For example, most of us are more bothered by the prospect of losing $100 than we are motivated to earn $100.
    • This frequently happens in new businesses. A brand-new business is highly motivated to grow. However, once it reaches a specific size, the owner begins to worry more about protecting what the business has gained than developing further.
  4. Confirmation bias. We have a natural tendency to interpret facts and situations in a way that supports our current beliefs. For example, highly religious people tend to interpret all good fortune as proof of the presence of God.
    • Those that believe that hard work is all that matters will ignore any other factors that contribute to success. They will also ignore the concepts of luck, talent, and mentorship.
    • How are your current beliefs tainting your interpretation of your life and your environment?
  5. Fatigue, stress, and other forms of discomfort. You’ve probably made more than your fair share of ineffective decisions while being tired, overstressed, or physically or psychologically uncomfortable. Discomfort of any kind can negatively affect the decision-making process.
  6. Personalization. Sometimes, we take things too personally. We might believe that we didn’t get a promotion because the boss didn’t like us. But sometimes people make decisions that have nothing to do with us.
    • Everyone has things going on in their life that we don’t know about. It’s a mistake to assume that everything is about you.

Fewer unwise decisions result in greater success and happiness. We create many of the challenges we face in life by making wrong decisions. Try to remove as many bad decisions from your future by understanding what leads to faulty decision-making. Make significant decisions and enjoy a great future!

Advice to Young Professional: Learning to make sound decisions is one of the most important decisions you’ll ever make

Do you want to quickly advance in your career? Make better decisions.

Learn how from my real-life experience and practical tools in the daily devotional21 Days to Sound Decision Making – How to Grow Your Credibility and Influence Through Making Better Decisions

It may be one of the most important decisions you ever make.

Thanks and take care,

Preston Poore

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Decision Fatigue: What It Is and How to Avoid It

September 8, 2020
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Each decision you make reduces your ability to make good decisions. It can quickly reach the point that you’ll actually avoid making decisions once a certain threshold is reached. There are only so many good decisions you can make each day.

Decision fatigue also leads to impulse spending. Self-regulation also suffers during decision fatigue. There’s a reason you’re more likely to eat unhealthy food or do something else detrimental to your well-being at night. 

Have you ever noticed that many influential and successful people tend to make inadequate decisions at night? These self-destructive decisions often come after a long day of making important decisions at work.

Use these strategies to avoid decision fatigue and make wise decisions:

  1. Make important decisions early in the day and during times of low stress. When you’re relaxed and in your safe space, you can kick back and make decisions without any pressure or distractions.
  2. Choose your clothes the night before. It’s mentally exhausting to search around for clothes that match when it’s time for work.
    1. You can also limit the scope of your wardrobe and achieve the same effect. Steve Jobs and Barack Obama were famous for their limited wardrobes. Both felt that the fewer decisions they had to make each day, the better.
  3. Plan your day the night before. Then, you just need to put your head down and get to work. You’ve already made the basic choices of how you’re going to spend your day. All that’s left to do is perform the necessary actions.
    1. For example, know what you’re having for lunch, breakfast, and dinner before going to bed.
    1. What are the most important things you have to do tomorrow? When will you do them?
    1. This will leave you with a more exceptional ability to make good decisions the next day.
  1. Keep your life simple. A complicated life is fatiguing. The fatigue extends to your ability to make decisions. Our brains weren’t designed to handle ongoing complexity. A simple life is easier on your mind and will allow you to make better decisions.
  2. Delegate decisions. Not all decisions have to be made by you. Let someone else pick the restaurant and the movie. Allow one of your employees to make the less-critical decisions. Let your kids decide what you’re going to do this weekend. Avoid decision fatigue by requiring others to make some decisions.
  3. Take a nap. A nap is a great way to rejuvenate your mental faculties. Sleeping for just 10-30 minutes will recharge your decision-making capacity. Make a daily nap part of your day, if possible.
  4. Know your priorities. When you know what is important to you, decisions become easier to make. Quick decisions don’t induce a lot of decision fatigue. You’ll avoid torturing yourself over all of your choices if you understand which decisions matter and which don’t.

The quality of your decisions influences the quality of your career, health, relationships, and overall success. Inadequate choices lead to personal challenges. These challenges include financial issues, work and school difficulties, health problems, and other personal and social issues.

Each decision you make has a biological cost. After making too many decisions, you’re more likely to argue with your partner, make unnecessary purchases, and eat junk food.

As your brain fatigues, it searches for shortcuts. One of these shortcuts is to make decisions quickly and recklessly. After all, thinking takes energy. The other alternative is to refuse to make a decision at all.

Decision fatigue is something everyone should be aware of. The consequences of inadequate decision-making can be severe.

*** Stop wasting time in the aftermath of bad choices when you can make decisions that deliver extraordinary results. Get the “Nine Point Sound-Decision Making Check List” sent straight to your inbox and start seeing exceptional results today. Visit: https://prestonpoore.com

Thanks, and take care,

Preston Poore

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Snowpocalypse: One Thing Leads to Another

January 22, 2020

Listen to the Podcast Version (19 min) – Much more exciting ; -) https://media.blubrry.com/thediscipledleader/content.blubrry.com/thediscipledleader/Snowpocalypse_v2.mp3


January 29, 2014 – First journal entry of the new year.  I am thankful and full of joy this morning.  I survived Atlanta’s “Snowpocalypse” yesterday.   Here’s my story…

The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for the Atlanta Metro area on Monday, January 27. It forecasted one to two inches of snow the next day. Nothing freaks Atlantans out more than a good snowstorm. It can cripple the city. Why? The “city in a forest” has deep tree coverage and rolling hills. The above-ground powerlines become vulnerable to falling trees weighed down by snow; power can be lost for days. No one knows how to cope with the inclement weather. At the threat of snow, we all panic and rush to buy a loaf of bread, milk, and alcohol to endure the event, like it’s the end of the world. 

And, no one knows how to drive in wintery conditions – some would argue that Atlantans don’t know how to drive at all. Our city is infamous for its horrendous traffic; it can take hours to get anywhere. The Atlanta Metro area has four major Interstates, I-75, I-85, I-20, and I-285, which accommodate dense traffic volume. It also has miles and miles of two-lane, narrow, curvy roads that extend throughout the city. Since the Atlanta Metro area is comprised of multiple outlying suburbs, most people commute to work accessing the interstates through the zigzagging artery roads. 

Now, add winter weather to the commuting mix. When snow falls and roads become icy, travel conditions quickly deteriorate. The city government didn’t have enough snowplows to clear significant thoroughfares, neglected to salt the streets before the first snowflake, or encourage residents to stay off the roads. Leadership was absent and didn’t take the forecast seriously. As a matter of fact, the governor and mayor were attending a luncheon where the mayor was honored as the Associated Press’s “Georgian of the Year.” The mayor overconfidently tweeted, “Atlanta, we are ready for the snow.”[1] We weren’t. 

I was overconfident too. I grew up in Colorado and really didn’t understand all of the fuss. I learned how to drive in all kinds of winter conditions; I wasn’t worried if a little snow fell. While confident that the imminent storm was no personal threat, I sent a note to my team telling them to keep an eye on the weather and leave early if needed.  

I drove to work as usual on Tuesday, an 18-mile, 60-minute commute. I attended meetings most of the morning with my last one scheduled at Noon. During the final meeting, I looked out the 16th-floor conference room window and saw huge snowflakes. The wind was picking up, and the storm intensified into what would ultimately become whiteout conditions. I looked down at the streets below and noticed that the intersections around the building were already jammed with traffic. My friend Paula called and encouraged me to leave the office. She warned me that any delay might mean I’d not make it home. I thought to myself, “Yeah, right. I’m from Colorado. I can handle this. Y’all panic. I got this.” I decided to ignore Paula’s advice, finish the meeting, and leave immediately afterward. 

My Noon meeting unexpectedly lasted until 1:45 pm . . . The weather conditions deteriorated even more, and traffic was snarled. From my vantage point on the 16th floor, I could see red tail lights for miles. I gathered my belongings to begin my trek home. I raced down to the parking garage and noticed a long line of cars waiting to exit. I asked the security guard what was going on, and he told me that drivers on the street weren’t allowing cars to exit the garage. Traffic was at a standstill, gridlocked. Then came the bad news. . . It would take 90 minutes just to get out of the garage and onto the side street.

“How long has the parking garage been backed up?” I asked.

“About 45 minutes,” he said.

Ugh. If I’d ended the meeting at 1:00 pm and gotten in my car, I might have avoided the mess.

“Do you know why the traffic is so bad?” I asked.

The security guard said, “All of the businesses and schools closed at the same time. Everyone is trying to get home or pick up their kids.”

So, let me get this straight. A massive snowstorm and everyone downtown or in school were released at the same time? Are you kidding me? No wonder there was so much congestion. I turned around, returned to my office, and thought that if I waited a little longer, the traffic would dissipate.  Boy, was I wrong.

I sat in my office for the next three hours, trying to decide whether to spend the night in the office or risk driving home. I decided to drive home and left at 4:45 pm. It was almost dark. Surely the traffic would have cleared out by now.

I decided to get on I-75 because it was the path most traveled and thought that it would be most clear vs. the side streets. It took an hour to go one mile.  One of the smartest things I did before going any further was to fill up my Toyota Camry’s gas tank.  The full tank gave me confidence that I wouldn’t run out of gas as I made my way home.  I packed water, a turkey sandwich, and vegetables.  I also had an empty cup in case I needed to relieve myself. I knew it was going to take an ample supply of patience and prayer to make it home safely. 

And it did. My journey home took 12 hours to drive 18 miles. I experienced complete standstill traffic in many spots and extremely icy conditions on hills.  Driving was like playing “Frogger,” an old video game where the object was to cross a river avoiding traps, hazards, and enemies. I literally dodged stalled, wrecked or abandoned cars working my way up I-75. Conditions were especially adverse at Moore’s Mill and West Paces Ferry exits.  Many cars and trucks couldn’t gain traction.  It was difficult to start after a complete stop going uphill on ice.  I almost got stuck outside of Moore’s Mill switching lanes, and my tires wouldn’t grip initially.  Adrenaline kicked in. My heart started beating rapidly as I shifted gears and worked to advance my car.  Thankfully, I quickly gained control and moved forward. Because of my traction issues, I made the hard choice not to aid other travelers. I watched people with good intentions get out of their vehicle to push another car or truck out of harm’s way only to become immobilized themselves. I know that sounds cold, but I knew that if I stopped to help someone, I’d risk being stuck as well. My mission was to get home.

After traveling 10 miles in 11 hours, I began to cross the Chattahoochee bridge into Cobb County. Traffic thinned. It was like making it through the gauntlet with a few lone survivors and one last test.  The scene ahead of me looked like the end of the world with more stalled cars in the middle of the road. Dimly flashing hazard lights everywhere indicated a vehicle that was abandoned; drivers gave up, got out, and started walking.  The ice grew thicker as the pavement disappeared.  No traction was possible.  All I could do was downshift to keep control of my speed and keep moving.  If I stopped, I knew I may not get started again and need to abandon my car.  Thankfully, I made it over the bridge, exited on Delk Road, and slowly crawled home.  Unlike the city of Atlanta, Cobb County cleared and salted the roads. It took only 30 minutes to travel from the exit to my house. 

Snowpocalypse was worse than you can imagine. . . See for yourself. Watch the CNN report, “Storm Paralyzes Atlanta, Causes Chaos”: https://youtu.be/Uwc2pidiJKo

After the taxing ride, I arrived home at 4:30 am.  This was all caused by schools and businesses all releasing their folks at the same time and during the start of the storm, no salt on the roads, and a lack of city government leadership.  But I take personal responsibility for making a series of terrible decisions that led to my delay.  I exercised awful judgment. Should I have left at Noon and heeded Paula’s advice?  Yes, but I ignored her call to action. Should I have left after the meeting at 1:45 pm and endured the parking garage delay? Yes, but I was impatient and further delayed. Should I have stayed the night at the AOC? Maybe, but I was overconfident that the ride home would be troublefree because I was an experienced winter condition driver. I take personal responsibility for these inept decisions.  Not once did I pause to anticipate conditions or circumstances, let alone pray about what I should do.

In spite of all my bad judgment, I am very thankful that I made it home and for those that prayed for my safety.  It was a great exercise in patience, prayer, and trusting the Lord as I worked my way home.  A great analogy for life.  And this is just my story.  There are countless others.  I think about kids on school buses stuck on the road trying to get home.  I remember all of the folks who wrecked or abandoned their cars. . . Or, people spending the night in places like Home Depot because they couldn’t go any further. 

As a side note, I did make one sound decision that night. Remember the cup I mentioned? I used it and learned that having an empty cup comes in handy in these types of situations if you know what I mean 😉 

***

Have you ever experienced a set of circumstances like I did? Have you made one wrong decision that led to another, and the outcome wasn’t what you planned? If so, know that you can weather the challenges you face, learn to make better decisions, and experience positive results by applying the below principles:

Exercise Good Judgment — Make the right decisions using good judgment. What is judgment? It’s “the ability to combine personal qualities with relevant knowledge and experience to form opinions and make decisions. It is what enables a sound choice in the absence of clear-cut, relevant data, or an obvious path.”[2] It’s the ability to anticipate, see parallels and patterns in data or circumstances that lead to positive decisions or outcomes. To develop good judgment, you’ll need to become a good listener, seek diverse thoughts, and gain experience making decisions. The choices you make build upon each other, they compound over time. They also have a ripple effect, impacting those around you – your family, friends, company, community, school, and place of worship. Decision-making is so vital that I want to focus your attention on the simple process for a moment. 

Did you know “various internet sources estimate that an adult makes about 35,000 remotely conscious decisions each day [in contrast a child makes about 3,000]? This number may sound absurd, but in fact, we make 226 decisions each day on just food alone, according to researchers at Cornell University.  As your level of responsibility increases, so does the smorgasbord of choices you are faced with: 

what to eat

what to wear

what to purchase

what we believe

what jobs and career choices we will pursue

how we vote

who to spend our time with

who we will date and marry

what we say and how we say it

whether or not we would like to have children

what we will name our children

who our children spend their time with

what they will eat, etc.”[3]

The more complex the decision, the more thinking you’ll need to do. When faced with an important decision to make or problem to solve, I recommend following the below steps:

#1 Define the decision to be made – This may be the hardest part. Write down the decision to be made or a problem to be solved. Why is it important to make or solve? What if you don’t decide or solve the problem? What if you delay? Is what you articulated the actual decision that needs to be made? How do you need to refine it? How will a sound decision benefit you and others?

#2 Identify alternatives – Brainstorm multiple options, gather information, and engage those who need to be involved in decision making or problem-solving. List the pros and cons of each alternative and predict possible outcomes. Ask questions like Which option will produce the greatest results at the lowest cost? How difficult will each choice be to implement? And, are the alternatives congruent to your or your key stakeholder’s values?

#3 Choose the best alternative – Evaluate each option and choose the one that will produce the highest return or good. Understand the risks you are taking, be able to explain how you made the decision, and move forward. A sage once told me, “a wise man makes a decision and doesn’t look back.”

#4 Implement your choice – Develop a plan, secure the resources, gain support, and put your decision into action. Monitor its progress. Not all decisions result in positive outcomes. Some decisions are plain wrong. You’ll make mistakes. If you fall off the horse, get back on. Have the courage to make changes when needed. On the flip side, some of your decisions will be sound and will produce positive results. 

#5 Reflect on your choice and outcomes – Post decision and implementation, take time to think about what happened. What worked? What didn’t work? What can I do differently next time? How can I apply what I learned? As Peter Drucker said: “Follow effective action with quiet reflection. From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action.” 

Developing good judgment requires experience, reflection, and applied learning. If you follow the above decision-making process consistently, over-time, you will make more and more decisions that produce positive outcomes. You’ll see patterns and parallels that you didn’t see before. You’ll develop the ability to anticipate results and synthesize information at a whole new level. And, you’ll make a positive difference in the world around you.

Be Tenacious – When I got in my car and started home, I realized that I made a series of bad decisions and didn’t exercise sound judgment. But I realized that I still needed to get home. I had to make sound decisions that would enable my safe return. Even though I made mistakes, I didn’t let them stop me. Thankfully, I didn’t give up and stayed with it. When you’ve made a wrong decision or experience a negative outcome, don’t give up. Learn from your mistakes. Find the inner resolve, dogged persistence, and single-mindedness to keep moving forward. Meet your objective, complete the play, or finish the race. I am reminded of the following illustration about reaching the finish line in spite of adversity:

Hours behind the runner in front of him, the last marathoner finally entered the Olympic stadium. By that time, the drama of the day’s events was almost over, and most of the spectators had gone home. This athlete’s story, however, was still playing out.

Limping into the arena, the Tanzanian runner grimaced with every step, his knee bleeding and bandaged from an earlier fall. His ragged appearance immediately caught the attention of the remaining crowd, who cheered him on to the finish line.

Why did he stay in the race? What made him endure his injuries to the end? When asked these questions later, he replied, “My country did not send me 7,000 miles to start the race. They sent me 7,000 miles to finish it.”[4]

Like the Tanzanian runner, set your mind to reach the finish line. Don’t let a few bad decisions or mistakes get in the way. Learn from them, make better decisions, and you’ll eventually experience positive results.

Pray – I’ve heard people say that the only thing they can do is pray. For the believer, praying is the first and most important thing you can do. Seek God for his protection, guidance, and wisdom. Ask him what to do, wait on him, and he will show you. Regarding my Snowpocalypse experience, I was way too confident in my winter condition driving experience. I took things into my own hands and experienced an unfortunate set of circumstances. But when I got on the road, I quickly surmised that it was going to take more than my driving skill and experience to get home. I turned to God and asked for his help. I had multiple conversations with him along the way. Time to think and reflect. I also prayed for stranded passengers as I passed them. Looking back, I am absolutely convinced that the Lord protected me and enabled me to arrive home safely.

Snowpocalypse was a paralyzing weather event in the Atlanta Metro area. But the great thing about the city government is that people learned from their mistakes. The next time snow and ice were forecasted the city went into action mode. They announced school closures early, pre-treated the roads with over 3,000 lbs. of de-icing materials, and encouraged everyone to stay off the roads. Residents followed the leadership’s direction, and Atlantans avoided the problems incurred during Snowpocalypse. Personally, I learned the need to make the right decisions, how to endure adverse conditions and the power of prayer. If you learn to exercise good judgment, are tenacious in challenging circumstances, and don’t give up and pray, you will experience positive results. 


[1] The Washington Post, Four lessons Georgia learned about snowstorms, February 13, 2014, https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/four-lessons-georgia-learned-about-snowstorms/2014/02/13/db1b2b5a-94cd-11e3-83b9-1f024193bb84_story.html

[2] Harvard Business Review, “The Elements of Good Judgment,” Sir Andrew Likierman, https://hbr.org/2020/01/the-elements-of-good-judgment

[3] Roberts Wesleyan College, Leading Edge Journal, 35,000 Decisions: The Great Choices of Strategic Leaders, https://go.roberts.edu/leadingedge/the-great-choices-of-strategic-leaders

[4] Swindoll, Charles R. Swindoll’s Ultimate Book of Illustrations & Quotes. Nashville, TN, Thomas Nelson, 1998, p. 210.

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THE CHOICE – What I Learned by Making a Foolish Hiring Decision

March 9, 2019

 

Don’t hire him. . .. He’s not a good fit. . .. If you do, it will be a mistake. . ..

I heard this from a couple of key leaders after I called seeking their advice. 

He has the right experience and transferable skills. . .. With a little coaching, he’ll be great. . ..

This is what a trusted peer who highly recommended Steve told me.

A different set of opinions.

I didn’t have much time to decide. I was under the gun to hire an associate to work with our business partners. I needed to recruit, interview and fill the open position within two weeks or I’d lose the headcount. If I lost the headcount, the work and relationship management would fall on my plate.

I moved swiftly and selfishly to hire Steve. Why? I saw potential, or so I told myself. I heard what I wanted to hear from the positive advice I received and ignored the other. Acting out of arrogance, I believed that I could single-handedly develop Steve’s analytical, relationship building and leadership skills.

Fast forward one year. . ..

Developing Steve took a lot of time and energy. Even though I had 10 other team members and was accountable for 18 markets, I spent 80% of my time with him and his specific market. 

I didn’t want Steve to fail. I saw his success as my responsibility since I decided against other’s counsel. I wanted to prove that I could help Steve reach his potential.

While Steve was hired into a harsh work environment and we believed he could breakthrough, he never gained traction with his assigned business partners or market. The business partners demanded more than Steve could deliver. When Steve stumbled, I had to compensate.

Over time, his business partners rejected him because of a perceived lack of credibility. Steve was no longer invited to meetings or trade rides, lost his ability to influence or add value.

I’d shared the business partners’ feedback with Steve along the way. Trying to support Steve, I continually spent time helping him solve problems and discuss his concerns. I always encouraged him. And, I was always genuine with him.

We built a plan to improve his performance and connection with the business partner. But Steve didn’t follow through on the plan. He’d lost heart.

I finally came to the realization that I couldn’t develop Steve as I thought. His skill set and motivational fit weren’t right for the role.

I made a mistake. . .. A change needed to happen for Steve’s benefit, for my team, for my company, for our business partners, and for the company. . .. And, for me.

I had another decision to make. . .. Do I place Steve on a formal Performance Improvement Plan (PIP) and exit him from the company?. . ..

After consulting with my leadership and human resources, we elected to place Steve on a PIP. It was a tough decision but the right one.

Then, I prayed for Steve. . .. I prayed that he’d be able to improve his performance or that God would provide for him if the PIP didn’t conclude with positive results. I also prayed for wisdom and a sensitive heart as I revealed the tough news to him.

I reached out to Steve to share our decision. As you can imagine, he wasn’t happy. 

Steve said, “NO ONE else faced the challenging work environment and difficult business partners as I have.” 

He demanded that I delay the PIP. . ..

I couldn’t. . .. I wouldn’t. . .. We’d put plans in place before, but he hadn’t acted on them. I listed a number of other performance-related issues and said no.

Frustrated, he said, “This is the first job I’ve had where if I didn’t get along with people, I could still do well at my job. I feel like such a failure.”

Steve was furious at first and then began to breakdown.

I was moved by Steve’s emotions. . .. I’d come to like Steve very much and knew he tried very hard. I wanted to encourage him amid another tough circumstance yet be real with him like I’d always been.

I told him, “Speaking from my heart, you are still valued and need to separate what is happening from who you are…It is up to you now to improve…90% don’t make it through the process, but others experience a career transformation.”

To make a long story short, Steve didn’t make it successfully through the PIP process and was about to be let go.

Then, something happened. . ..

A role opened up in another part of the company that better suited Steve’s skill set and was the perfect motivational fit. Typically, an associate wasn’t eligible to interview for other roles while under a PIP. Because of the right job fit, my leadership, HR partner and I extended grace to Steve and approved his interview. Showing dignity for Steve, we agreed that sometimes people are in the wrong role and wanted to do the right thing for him.

And guess what? . . .. He got the job!

***

What did I learn from my experience with Steve?

  • Be an Unselective Listener: Even though I sought wise counsel from others, I selectively listened to what they said. I pieced together what I wanted to hear and rationalized my decision. Admittedly, I had my own agenda, was stubborn and acted out of arrogance. The Bible says, “Fools are headstrong and do what they like; wise people take advice.” (Proverbs 12:15 – The Message). If I’d listened early on, Steve and I wouldn’t have suffered through the tough circumstances. My advice: When seeking counsel, objectively listen to others and don’t filter your thoughts with pre-determined bias.
  • Show Dignity and Respect for Others: During challenging circumstances with Steve, I always tried to encourage him, help him feel valued and be genuine with him. The Bible says, “Here is a simple, rule-of-thumb guide for behavior: Ask yourself what you want people to do for you, then grab the initiative and do it for them. . .. (Matthew 7:12 – The Message). Helping Steve navigate through the circumstances, I always demonstrated respect and dignity for him. I remained professional. That’s the way I’d want to be treated. Wouldn’t about you? 
  • Pray Always: I didn’t pray about my decision to hire Steve and moved without consulting God. It became a mess. But I did pray amid the mess and God was faithful. He helped Steve and provided a new opportunity. For Believers, we need to lift EVERYTHING in prayer, and it should become a lifestyle for us. The Bible says, “Pray without ceasing” (1 Thessalonians 5:17 ESV). Take every moment and opportunity to pray. Make it a continual conversation with God and a way of life. If you do, God will guide you, your decisions and your circumstances.

If you listen unselectively, show dignity and respect for others and pray always, you’ll become savvy decision maker and leader.

***

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Thanks for reading!

Preston Poore

 

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Becoming a God-Confident Leader

January 26, 2019

 

A couple of years ago, I enrolled in a Christian Writers Conference in Estes Park, CO. Since the conference was held in May, I decided to commute back and forth to the YMCA from my parent’s home in Fort Collins. My typical route to Estes Park was closed due to flooding and road construction. The detour to Estes Park was through Hwy 36, a winding and scenic 90-minute drive.  

May is a beautiful time of year in Colorado. But sometimes the weather can be very unpredictable. That’s when I met Valarie – Winter Storm Valarie that is…On May 18, 2017, Estes Park and the surrounding area received over 30 inches of snow. To get a feel for the road conditions, view the following videl: https://youtu.be/28L1CAQqZ8M?t=5

The snowstorm limited my attendance at the writer’s conference. I was very frustrated by the circumstances I’d encountered and here’s what I recorded in my journal:

Bummed…I came to Colorado to attend a Christian Writers Conference with the goal of connecting with publishers and agents and learning how to market my book, “The Discipled Leader.”  I attended the first day but missed the rest of the confrence.  You see, I made some bad decisions and circumstances beyond my control prevented me from going.  I planned to commute back and forth to Mom and Dad’s house during the conference. The weather forecast predicted heavy snowfall in Estes Park beginning Wednesday night.  I thought that I could commute on Wednesday and then travel back up to Estes Park on Thursday morning, stay at the YMCA through Friday night and come back on Saturday.

It was snowing hard when I woke up Thursday morning.  The night before, I dreamed about my journey up Hwy 36 into Estes Park and the snow storm.  I stressed out during my dream and felt like I heard “don’t go.”  But I did.  I felt confident that I was going to make it up the pass because the road would be plowed and sanded.  Heck, I grew up in Colorado and knew I could handle the conditions. Or so I thought. . .

Things began to deteriorate as I drove up the canyon. Rounding a bend, I saw a line of cars and police lights on top of the mountain in front of me.  It was snowing hard, and the road was becoming more treacherous.  I stopped a van that’d turned around and was coming back down the mountain.  The driver told me that the police closed the road and weren’t letting anyone through. After experiencing the conditions and hearing what the driver said, I had no choice, I had to turn around and go back home before the storm worsened.

Timing – one other circumstance…When I drove home Wednesday night, the low-pressure tire sensor came on.  Dad and I took it to a local dealership to have them check it first thing Thursday morning. The mechanic filled the tire with air but wouldn’t fix the leak because we didn’t have an appointment.  So, I went to another tire place. The good news is that they took me right away. The helpful mechanic found a nail in the tire, plugged the hole and finished in 15 minutes.  And, I guess because of the troubled look on my face, they didn’t charge me.  But my tire escapade delayed my morning departure.

So, I left later than I planned.  Had I left 30 to 45 minutes earlier, I may have made it to Estes Park, but I didn’t. Because of the Winter Storm Valarie, I wrote the conference lead to tell her that I wasn’t going to be able to make the rest of the conference and requested a refund.  The whole thing was a missed opportunity.

I don’t know why this happened.  I don’t understand.  Maybe I never will.  I’m very frustrated with God…I’m trying to “love him and develop people,” to disciple others.  But I seem to be thwarted, resisted at every turn.  It seems that all paths are going nowhere and all of the opportunities are drying up.  Staying with Dad through Sunday morning and heading home.

Maybe you hear the frustration in my voice. At the time, I couldn’t understand why the circumstances turned out the way they appeared. But here’s the rest of the story…

Because of the snow storm and my returning to my parent’s house, I was able to invest the rest of the weekend with my Dad. My Mom was traveling, and Dad was at home alone for a few weeks. We hung out together and talked about life. Toward the end of the weekend, I had the opportunity to share the Gospel with Dad. He later gave his life to the Lord, but that’s a whole different story.

Lastly, my enrollment in the writer’s conference afforded me the opportunity for paid agent or publisher 1:1s and was the main reason I enrolled in the conference. The goal of meeting with the agents and publishers was to pitch my book and receive feedback hoping all along that an agent would sign me. You can imagine the disappointment of not getting the chance to network with agents and publishers when you’ve been working on a manuscript for seven years. 

But God was good. After the conference, I contacted some of the agents and told them my circumstances. Several of them agreed to meet with me over the phone. One of the agents I spoke with encouraged me to keep writing with the help of an editor. A year and lots of hard work later, I signed a contract with Credo Communications literary agency to represent my book to publishers.

I didn’t see it, but God was working out my circumstances even though I couldn’t see it at the time. If I’d attended all of the conference, I’d missed the opportunity to invest time with my Dad and share the Gospel with him. And, God made a way to sign with an agent even though it appeared my efforts were fruitless.

Three verses come to mind:

#1 – “In their hearts humans plan their course, but the Lord establishes their steps” (Proverbs 16:9 NIV) – God governs our world and engineers all circumstances. I had a plan, and in the midst of what seemed like a fruitless of string events, God worked things out. 

#2 – “That’s why we can be so sure that every detail in our lives of love for God is worked into something good” (Romans 8:28 MSG) – For the Christian, the events in our lives are worked into good. We may not see it right away or ever. In the midst of my circumstances, I couldn’t see what good could come from striking out. But what I saw as striking out turned into an opportunity for something more significant.

#3 – “Trust God from the bottom of your heart; don’t try to figure out everything on your own. Listen for God’s voice in everything you do, everywhere you go; he’s the one who will keep you on track” (Proverbs 3:5-6) – Trusting God and that’s he’s got your back will make a big difference in how you see events in your life unfold.

What about you? What happens when you encounter circumstances that don’t work out the way you planned? Do you trust that God engineers all circumstances and works every detail into something good? Friend, I encourage you to trust God with all of your plans, and if you do, you’ll become a God-confident leader. 

 

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How to Gain Credibility & Increase Your Influence through Problem Solving

December 22, 2018

 

Have you ever dealt with a head-scratching, complicated problem and you weren’t sure how to solve it? I have. . .. Here are my story and seven steps to solving unsolvable problems – if you’ll follow them, you’ll gain credibility and increase your influence. . ..

The anticipated announcement was made: The large beverage company I worked for agreed to purchase two competitive beverage companies. The incoming water and juice brands were fantastic and complementary acquisitions to our existing portfolio.

However, the acquisitions came with complications and created internal competition. Each acquired company had its own sales team and making their plan. My role was similar with a focus on my company’s legacy brands.

During my tenure, I’d established strong relationships with the bottler. However, my influence slowly eroded as the new sales teams began integrating. The new team members leveraged exciting incentives, expensive dinners and premiums to woo the bottler. Excluding me, they tied up meeting times and market visits. Our mutual bottling partner became enamored with the shiny new penny and took their eyes off the ball. 

Execution of all the legacy brands began to slip, and total sales stagnated. I discovered that the newly acquired business only contributed 10% of the total bottler’s revenue contribution — all of the legacy brands I represented contributed 90%. I determined that our problem boiled down to focus; if we didn’t re-calibrate our focus on the 90%, we wouldn’t make the plan. At the same time, we needed the newly acquired brands to flourish.

I began considering my alternatives. The only solution I could think of was to fight fire with fire. I’d need to double my efforts. Get back in the game with more attractive incentives, fancy dinners and premiums to woo the bottler’s attention back. I wasn’t entirely comfortable with this approach but believed there was a solution somewhere. I just didn’t know where.

I was stuck. . ..

I prayed to God and asked for wisdom to meet the challenge and identify a game-changing solution. 

Then it happened. . .. Inspiration hit. . ..

I remember watching my all-time favorite movie, the 1959 Academy Award-winning Ben-Hur.  There’s a scene when the movie’s main character, Judah Ben-Hur was observing a chariot race practice. The chariot was pulled by a team of four strong and fast horses. However, the chariot driver lost control of the horses as the team ran wildly down the track. Just before the chariot approached a curve, Ben-Hur commented that the chariot would never make the turn.

And he was right . . .. The horses ran straight through the turn and off the track. When asked how he knew that the chariot would run off course, Ben-Hur told the owner he raced in the Roman circus. Based on his experience, he observed that the horses were strong and fast, but they weren’t positioned to leverage their individual strengths. They were running as individuals, not as one. Ben-Hur rearranged the horses with the slower, more steady horse on the inside to anchor the team during turns and the fastest horse on the outside. The owner said, “Show me.” To the owner’s amazement, Ben-Hur raced the chariot around the track in record time without incident.

The parallel was striking to me. We have a strong team of people representing our brands to the bottler. I wondered, “What if we worked together and everyone achieved their goals? What if I harnessed the team, positioned them by strength and we ran as one?” 

Said another way, if you can’t beat them, join them.

After some internal alignment and planning, I invited 15 new brands and bottler representatives to a groundbreaking “Brand Partner Summit.” Our objective was to build trust, open lines of communication, initiate collaborative planning, enable dynamic execution, make the plan, and most of all, stem internal competition. 

The meeting’s theme was “Running as One.” We began our time together horseback riding in the Smokey Mountains – a chance for everyone to connect outside the office and get acquainted. After the team building exercise, we gathered for a Roles and Responsibilities dinner. All of the individuals shared how he or she added value to the company. The next day, I opened the Summit with the Ben-Hur chariot practice movie scene and asked the team to consider how we begin to run as one. Participants started making connections and collaboration recommendations as we reviewed each other’s business updates, priorities, and plans.

Ultimately, the Brand Partners concluded that our initiatives needed to be integrated into a comprehensive monthly Sales Plan. The Sales Plan captured and communicated all of the execution priorities allowing the Brand Partners and our bottling partner to all be on the same page.  

The Sales Plan solution mitigated internal competition, collaboration improved, execution excelled, and everyone hit his or her business plan. We ran as one. So much so that our Brand Partner Summit and Sales Plan were deemed a best practice and adopted by other parts of the company.

If you’re faced with a problem like I was, I recommend you follow my seven steps to solving unsolvable problems:

1.         Define the Problem – Articulate the problem in writing. Distill the problem into its simplest form. For my above example, the problem was focus. Identify the implications and consequences of not solving it. Also, ask repeatedly why? that is a problem. This will help identify root causes

2.         Provide Context – What is the history of the challenge you’re trying to solve?

3.         Believe There is a Solution – Have the attitude that all problems are opportunities and that they can be addressed. Be creative, use your imagination and brainstorm with others

4.         Identify Alternatives – It’s always best to determine multiple solutions and evaluate which one will best solve the problem

5.         Develop a Recommendation – Based on your alternative evaluation, allow the best one to surface

6.         Plan and Act – Once the recommendation is made, put a plan in place and execute it

7.         Pray – For the person of faith, I highly recommend praying and seeking God’s wisdom when faced with problems or decision making. The Bible says, “Trust God from the bottom of your heart; don’t try to figure out everything on your own. Listen for God’s voice in everything you do, everywhere you go; he’s the one who will keep you on track. Don’t assume that you know it all”. (Proverbs 3:5–6 – The Message)

The fastest way to gain credibility and increase your influence is to solve problems. If you, define the problem, provide context, believe there is a solution, identify alternatives, make a recommendation, plan and act and pray, you will become a leader who makes a positive difference.

 

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Preston Poore

I’m a disciple of Christ and an executive at a Fortune 500 Company. In my blog, The Discipled Leader, I draw on my diverse business experience to help Christians connect their secular and spiritual lives at work.

As a certified coach, speaker, and trainer with the John Maxwell Team, I help others grow their relationship with Christ, develop their leadership skills, and understand how they can make a positive difference in today’s chaotic world.

Let me help you reach your potential.

I draw on my diverse business experience to help Christians connect their secular and spiritual lives at work. I invite you to subscribe to my blog and learn how to develop Christlike character, influence your culture and change your world.

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